❀ Do any of these scenarios sound familiar? ❀

You're ABD and a parent of two children. You're managing the work-family balance fine, but if you have to check the punctuation of another footnote you will scream.

You're a scholar whose first language is not English. You've been living and working in an English-speaking country for over two decades, but there are still a few fine points of grammar that challenge you. You'd like to make sure everything's perfect before submitting your article proposal for journal consideration.

You're a newly hired assistant professor. Your manuscript is making its way through the publishing process, and you've been told that it's your responsibility to provide the index. You're short on funds, but with three new course preps, you don't have time to do it yourself.

You're hoping to self publish the results of your research. You've seen badly done self-published books, and you don't want your hard work diminished by poor presentation. You know that an index helps sell non-fiction books, and you also want to make sure that there are no typos or grammatical errors to undermine your credibility.

You've applied for and received a grant to help with your research. It won't cover transportation and housing to the Chicago area, but you'd still like to tap into the archives here. It would be nice if someone experienced in historical research could investigate them on your behalf.

You're been working on this one article for what seems like months now, and you're losing your ability to view it objectively. You'd like advice about how to re-organize your argument and help cleaning up your prose, but you want the finished revision to still sound like “you.”

You have a disability that makes working with written materials challenging. Sometimes you'd like help with small tasks, like cleaning up the formatting on your syllabi. Sometimes you need more substantial assistance, such as transcribing a handwritten primary source into clean machine-readable text.